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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 103-109

Impact of pregnancy outcomes on postpartum depression among women attending primary health-care centers in Al-Madina Al-Munawarah, Saudi Arabia


1 Unit of Joint Post-Graduate Family Medicine Program; Academic Affairs for Training and Research, King Salman Bin Abdel-Aziz Medical City, Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia
2 Diabetic Center in King Fahd Hospital and Sayed Al Shohada Primary Health Care Center, Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia
3 Infection Control Department, Al-Amal Hospital, Directorate of Health, Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Health Affairs for Planning and Organizational Transformation, Directorate of Health, Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia
5 Department of Health administration Directorate of Health, Taibah Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawara, Saudi Arabia
6 Unit of Joint Post-Graduate Family Medicine Program, King Salman Bin Abdel-Aziz Medical City, Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia
7 Department of Neuropsychiatry, Sohag Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Egypt
8 Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Taibah Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawara, Saudi Arabia; Department of Medical Biochemistry, Sohag Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Salah Mohamed El Sayed
Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Taibah Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah; Department of Medical Biochemistry, Sohag Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Egypt.

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjhs.sjhs_247_20

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Background: Postpartum depression (PPD) afflicts women and their families negatively. Unfortunately, PPD often goes undetected and untreated. We previously reported that PPD prevalence was 19.4% in Al-Madina region, Saudi Arabia. Objectives: The objective of the study was to identify significant risk factors of PPD among women in Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia. Methodology: A multistage random sampling technique recruited women visiting primary health-care centers in Al-Madina to immunize their babies. A cross-sectional descriptive study was done using Arabic translation of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale for PPD screening using a cutoff score of ≥12. Our study also investigated demographic and other possible PPD risk factors. Results: This study enrolled 216 women out of 224 (response rate is 96.4%). PPD was not significantly associated with pregnancy planning, infant's gender, or infant's age. Primiparous women (n = 92, 42.7%) had a significant PPD risk (P < 0.05). More than half of mothers enrolled in our study (n = 124, 57.4%) were multiparous. Nearly 30.6% of participants (n = 66) used breastfeeding, while formula feeding was present in 40.7% (n = 88). PDD was reported more among women who breastfed their babies (27.3%) compared to those who artificially fed their babies (15.9%) and those using mixed feeding (16.1%). PPD was more significant among women who delivered by vaginal delivery (P < 0.05) compared to those delivered by cesarean section. Congenital abnormality of babies was reported by almost one-sixth of women (n = 36, 16.7%) but were not significantly associated with PPD. Conclusion: More than half of women having PPD (n = 124, 57.4%) were multiparous. PPD may negatively impair women's future pregnancy plans due to depression. PPD is significantly associated with primiparity and vaginal delivery and increases with breastfeeding. To the authors, PPD is a serious medical condition that should be taken into account with all deliveries. Primiparity is a risk factor, and PPD should be anticipated in primiparous women. Psychiatric evaluation and psychotherapy may be needed to help women and alleviate their fears in future pregnancies. Gynecologists should be aware of PPD and should receive a clinical experience in that. Psychiatric consultation is highly recommended whenever necessary.


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