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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 119-124

Serum copper, zinc, and copper − zinc ratio in children with malaria


1 Department of Medical Laboratory Science, School of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Basic Health Sciences, Achievers University, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Mathias Abiodun Emokpae
Department of Medical Laboratory Science, School of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City, Edo State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjhs.sjhs_62_22

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Background: Nutrition is not only vital to reducing the risk of individual's susceptibility to malaria infection but enhances the prevention and treatment of disease. Nutrition can also modify the course of malaria infection, especially among children. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of copper, zinc, and copper − zinc ratio in children with malaria infection and correlate same with parasite density. Setting and Design: A cross-sectional study of malaria-infected children randomly recruited from two secondary health institutions in Benin City, Nigeria. Methods: A total of 200 malaria-infected children (age range 0.5–11 years, 113 (56.3%) males and 87 (43.7%) females were recruited in the study. Semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the sociodemographic data. Blood sample was collected from each of the participants and malaria parasite density was determined using thick blood film. Serum zinc and copper were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Statistical Analysis Used: The categorical and continuous data were compared using the Chi-square, unpaired Student's-test, and analysis of variance, respectively. Results: Serum copper was significantly higher among malaria-infected children than nonmalaria infected children, while zinc was significantly lower in malaria-infected subjects than controls. The copper/zinc ratio was significantly higher in malaria infected than nonmalaria infected children. Serum copper and copper/zinc ratio correlated positively while zinc correlated negatively with malaria parasite density. Conclusion: The observed significantly higher copper and copper/zinc ratio and lower zinc level may indicate oxidative stress, inflammation, and lower immune status in malaria infection.


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